the bad guy: stories from the autism spectrum

I.

I grew up in a place where girls are encouraged to be “girly” at an early age, and boys are encouraged to be “manly”.

I was too shy and introverted and clumsy-headed to really play the role. Early on in life, I was pretty scared of people…I couldn’t make sense of them; I just saw people as these vague, menacing specters. As a result, I needed a lot of down time. I just wanted to be alone, reading, hiding away.

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The Myth of “Official”: autism and self-diagnosis skeptics

I.

In 2005, at the age of 30, I began therapy and received a diagnosis of Asperger’s Syndrome (now Autism Spectrum Disorder). It caught me off guard, because I had gone in specifically to receive help with depression and social anxiety. A spectrum diagnosis was not on my radar, and it took me over a year to fully come to terms with the reality of it.

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The Hidden Visible: a conversation with Serena McCarroll

Serena McCarroll first began to experience chronic pain during her training at the Royal Winnipeg Ballet School. She would later develop additional challenges with proprioception, the body’s ability to continually sense and integrate its movement and position. 

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Aspergers and Depression: an overview

Intro

The ongoing Aspergers Syndrome (AS) and depression series been staggered out here over the course of two years, so I wanted to provide an overview of the entire discussion in one location. This will include a brief synopsis of each segment, as well as a links to each post.

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Autism Discussion: Eye Contact, IEPs and Compliance

I’ve written a lot about my efforts to learn body language, and the fact that doing so often left me feeling more disconnected from people, not less. The problem is that having to consciously learn non-verbal communication can make a social interaction feel more like an obstacle course than a genuine exchange.

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